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'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools

Yahoo News - 16 hours 15 min ago

'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schoolsThe CDC issued additional guidance this week on safely reopening schools, with infections spiking in the South and West.


Philippine officials faked data showing ex-Wirecard exec in country

Yahoo News - 16 hours 59 min ago

Philippine officials faked data showing ex-Wirecard exec in countryPhilippine immigration officers falsified records to show ex-Wirecard executive Jan Marsalek briefly visited the country after he was sacked from the collapsed German payments processor, the justice minister said Saturday. German and Philippine authorities want to question the former chief operating officer as part of their separate investigations into the Wirecard accounting scandal, but his whereabouts are unclear. Entries in the Bureau of Immigration database show Marsalek arrived in the Philippines on June 23 -- the day after he was fired -- and left for China on June 24.


This 24-year-old pro-Trump Republican could become Gen Z's first member of Congress

Yahoo News - 17 hours 34 sec ago

This 24-year-old pro-Trump Republican could become Gen Z's first member of CongressThe real estate investor beat out a Trump-backed candidate in North Carolina. But his victory is no "referendum" on the president he supports, Cawthorn said.


Letters to the Editor: On paying $3,000 for a COVID-19 drug developed with taxpayer funding

Yahoo News - 17 hours 15 min ago

 On paying $3,000 for a COVID-19 drug developed with taxpayer fundingDrug companies will undertake expensive research and development only when taxpayers contribute. This is unfair and counterproductive.


Virus spike in Spain reveals plight of seasonal farm workers

Yahoo News - 17 hours 40 min ago

Virus spike in Spain reveals plight of seasonal farm workersIn the 20 years since he left his native Senegal, Biram Fall has never slept in the streets. This week, when he ran out of savings after failing to find work in northern Spain’s peach orchards, he still refused to do so. As part of an army of cheap labor that follows the ripening of different crops across the country, the 52-year-old responded in May to an urgent call for workers in Lleida, a major gateway to surrounding fertile farmland.


Native American protesters blocked the road leading up to Mount Rushmore and faced off with the National Guard in the hours before Trump's fiery speech

Yahoo News - 17 hours 54 min ago

Native American protesters blocked the road leading up to Mount Rushmore and faced off with the National Guard in the hours before Trump's fiery speechThe protesters were sprayed with pepper spray and 15 people were arrested during the demonstration on Friday.


US supreme court gives conservatives the blues but what's really going on?

Yahoo News - 18 hours 16 min ago

US supreme court gives conservatives the blues but what's really going on?Donald Trump’s nomination of two justices seemed to have tilted the balance decisively but recent rulings have raised eyebrowsFor all the ominous twists of Donald Trump’s presidency, his placement on the US supreme court of two deeply conservative justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, inspired a special kind of foreboding for many liberals.With three conservatives already sitting on the court, the creation by Trump of a seemingly impregnable, five-vote conservative supreme court majority appeared to pose a generational threat to essential American rights and freedoms.But as the first full term with the two Trump “supremes” draws to a close, a curious development has taken hold. Last month, the court handed down a trio of rulings that clashed directly with Trump’s agenda on the hot-button issues of abortion, immigration and LGBTQ+ rights – angering the president, tentatively pleasing progressives and leaving many court watchers to scratch their heads.There never was any doubt about the kind of supreme court that Trump and his sponsors set out to build. But suddenly there is doubt everywhere about how close – or far – their project has come to success.“I’ve referred to this past month at the supreme court as Blue June,” said Josh Blackman, a conservative court analyst and professor at the South Texas College of Law. “It seems as if almost all the big cases went to the left, and it’s made conservatives blue – that is, sad.”First Gorsuch wrote an opinion destroying the Trump administration’s argument that a 1964 law prohibiting employment discrimination “because of sex” does not apply to homosexual or transgender employees. “Today, we must decide whether an employer can fire someone simply for being homosexual or transgender,” Gorsuch wrote. “The answer is clear.”Then Chief Justice John Roberts, a George W Bush appointee, found that the government had failed to make its case for ending a program protecting so-called Dreamers – undocumented immigrants who arrived to the US as children.“Do you get the impression that the Supreme Court doesn’t like me?” Trump tweeted after the decision was released.Roberts struck again later in the month, vacating a Louisiana anti-abortion law on the grounds that the supreme court had vacated an identical law in Texas just four years earlier, before the arrival of Gorsuch and Kavanaugh.Roberts’ defection eliminated the law in a narrow 5-4 ruling.Daniel Goldberg, legal director at the progressive Alliance For Justice, called the victory on abortion surprising, but not because it demonstrated some unforeseen liberal bent on the part of the justices.“You know what surprises me, is that it wasn’t 9-0,” said Goldberg. “What does it say that four justices were completely willing to ignore precedent just four years old?“The response to these decisions just epitomizes how extreme the conservative legal movement is in this country.”Legal analysts cautioned the recent unexpected rulings were not signs of real moderation, and they said the court had moved unmistakably to the right under Trump.Gorsuch and Kavanaugh were willing to expose about 700,000 Dreamers to deportation, and both justices argued in favor of upholding the Louisiana abortion law, which was seen as posing an existential threat to the landmark Roe v Wade decision. Even in tipping that case to the left, Roberts emphasized that he was not doing so on the merits.“He has been consistently not supportive of abortion rights,” said Gillian Metzger, a professor of constitutional law at Columbia University, of Roberts. “I would not read into his decision any signal that, if confronted with a new kind of abortion measure, or even potentially if confronted with an effort to really rethink reproductive rights generally, that Roberts would necessarily be a very sympathetic respondent.”The court has advanced other conservative causes this term, expanding presidential power and challenging the separation of church and state by releasing public funding for religious schools.In one case, the four most conservative justices, including Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, ruled in favor of forcibly reopening California churches, against the will of state officials, in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, so that Christians could celebrate Pentecost. Again, with Roberts’ defection, they were overruled.Multiple analysts said Trump’s failure, despite having a sympathetic court, to deliver on his promises to dismantle Barack Obama’s healthcare law and roll back abortion rights, could lie partly with flaws in his own administration’s legal strategies.In a series of cases, Trump lawyers have advanced arguments that Roberts has found to be pretextual or beside the point, as when administration lawyers said they wanted to include a question about citizenship on the US census because they wanted better data to ensure protection of voting rights.Roberts, whose light touch as the presiding officer in Trump’s impeachment trial just seven months ago was seen as aiding Trump’s expeditious acquittal, doubted the argument. “Reasoned decision-making calls for an explanation for agency action,” he wrote. “What was provided here was more of a distraction.”A similar objection – not to say exasperation – was detectable in Roberts’ recent ruling to leave in place the Dreamers program. Lawyers defending immigrants in the case said the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was trying to pretend that it might want to keep the program, but its hands were tied because parts of the program had been thrown out in court.Again, Roberts detected a note of disingenuousness. “An agency must defend its actions based on the reasons it gave when it acted,” he wrote. “This is not the case for cutting corners to allow DHS to rely upon reasons absent from its original decision.”“You see Roberts much more willing to push back on that side of the Trump administration, and so I would say that’s been a shift,” said Metzger. “Over time the Trump administration is losing a little bit of the benefit of the doubt.”Rulings remaining in the current term – there are eight outstanding cases – could include powerful conservative decisions that could yet erase any memory of the court’s recent moderation.In Trump v Mazars USA, the court is expected to rule on whether financial and accounting firms that have worked with Trump must hand over tax records subpoenaed by Congress, in what analysts say is a major test for the balance of powers in the US system of government.“Although Trump v Mazars is about the tax records, it’s actually about a more basic constitutional principle, which is whether or not Congress can take meaningful oversight of the executive branch,” said Metzger. “And if Congress cannot do that, then we really are moving much more towards an authoritarian presidential regime.”Just a few months after the last ruling of the term is issued, a much larger ruling will be handed down, with much broader implications, by some 140 million voters in the November presidential elections.If Democrat Joe Biden can defeat Trump, he appears likely to have the opportunity to appoint at least two justices, with the octogenarian liberal justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer, nearing retirement. The Democrats would have to win the Senate too to ensure a smooth confirmation process and preserve the court’s current ideological balance.“If the Democrats have the Senate, I think it’s very likely that Ginsburg retires immediately and Breyer retires the next year, two back-to-back,” said Blackman. “That wouldn’t affect the composition of the court, unless Justice [Clarence] Thomas becomes ill, so I think the court would more or less stay the same for a while.”But if they win a strong majority, Democrats could attempt to pass reforms to bring the court more in line with the popular will, by adding seats to the court or imposing time limits on justices.Whatever the election outcome, the last court term of Trump’s first term seems likely to be noted for its unpredictable twists.“This is a very strange term,” said Blackman. “I don’t remember one quite like it.”


Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

Yahoo News - 19 hours 16 min ago

Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a WarFighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. What that means is that “sensor to shooter” time (how fast data can go from a sensor to a war-fighter) needs to be drastically sped up. Without that speed, warfighters won’t be able to react as quickly to threats and it will be harder to win.


Nevada officials report 49% mask mandate compliance, Sisloak calls the report 'disappointing, unacceptable'

Yahoo News - 20 hours 36 min ago

Nevada officials report 49% mask mandate compliance, Sisloak calls the report 'disappointing, unacceptable'Nevada officials report a 49% compliance rate of the governor's mask mandate at businesses throughout the state ahead of the Fourth of July holiday - a finding that Gov. Steve Sisolak calls "disappointing and unacceptable." Jeremy Chen reports.


Thousands gather for 4th of July fireworks show in Fresno County

Yahoo News - 20 hours 38 min ago

Thousands gather for 4th of July fireworks show in Fresno County
      The coronavirus pandemic didn't stop thousands from coming to one of the only firework shows happening in Fresno County.


Just How Powerful Are China's Aircraft Carriers?

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 23:30

Just How Powerful Are China's Aircraft Carriers?Can they stand against America's?


NYC shootings: No end in sight to dramatic rise in gun violence

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 22:30

 No end in sight to dramatic rise in gun violence
      In all, 10 shootings occurred on Thursday, involving 14 victims.


Over 200,000 evacuated as flooding, mudslides strike southwestern Japan

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 22:11

Over 200,000 evacuated as flooding, mudslides strike southwestern JapanJapan's Meteorological Agency (JMA) issued a dire warning for flooding and landslides for two prefectures in southwestern portions of Japan as an unprecedented deluge unfolded Friday into Saturday.Approximately 203,200 people in the hard-hit prefectures of Kumamoto and Kagoshima are under evacuation orders, with around 126,500 people being told to evacuate in Yatsushiro City alone, according to Kyodo News.On top of the evacuation orders, over a dozen people are presumed have died due to the flooding according to AP News.The Kuma River, which flows through the Kumamoto prefecture has risen well above its banks, washing away at least one bridge and cutting off citizens from rescue crews.In response to the flooding, the JMA issued its highest grade of warning for flooding and landslides across the two prefectures. According to the agency, this is the first time these two areas have been placed under these warnings.The warnings that were issued cover the Kumamoto cities of Amakusa, Yatsushiro and Hitoyoshi, and parts of Kagoshima, including the cities of Isa and Akune.According to rain gauge data in the vicinity of the heaviest rainfall, reports of 16 to 18 inches (407 to 472 millimeters) of rain fell in the area between Friday afternoon and midday Saturday, local time.As a result, numerous accounts of landslides and major river flooding have been reported in these areas.Government officials have reported that some 10,000 members of the Self-Defense Force are being deployed to the area to assist with ongoing rescues and flood relief efforts.Unfortunately, the storm system responsible for the heavy rainfall will continue to bring a threat across many of the same areas across Japan throughout the weekend and into the day on Monday before coming to an end."Moisture will continue to stream into southwestern Japan through at least early week, leading to daily rounds of rain and thunderstorms, some of which can be heavy. This can exacerbate any ongoing flooding problems and perhaps create new ones, while also severely slowing rescue and recovery efforts," AccuWeather Meteorologist Renee Duff explained.Citizens and those assisting with ongoing relief efforts will need to remain on alert as the threat of additional rainfall which could trigger flooding and landslide concerns persists.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


Kimberly Guilfoyle, Donald Trump Jr.'s girlfriend and campaign official, tests positive for coronavirus

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 21:13

Kimberly Guilfoyle, Donald Trump Jr.'s girlfriend and campaign official, tests positive for coronavirusKimberly Guilfoyle, a Trump campaign official and girlfriend of Donald Trump, Jr., has tested positive for the coronavirus.


Five ways Hong Kong has changed under China's security law

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 20:51

Five ways Hong Kong has changed under China's security lawBeijing's new national security law for Hong Kong is the most radical shift in how the semi-autonomous city is run since it was handed back to China by Britain in 1997. China's authoritarian leaders say the powers will restore stability after a year of pro-democracy protests and will not stifle freedoms. A key pillar of Hong Kong's success has been an independent judiciary, insulated from mainland China's party-controlled courts and their conviction rates of around 99 percent.


Nagaland dog meat: Animal rights groups hail ban as 'major turning point'

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 19:20

 Animal rights groups hail ban as 'major turning point'Animal rights groups say a ban on the sale of dog meat in Nagaland is a milestone.


Ethiopian pop star's murder reveals political rifts

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 18:41

Ethiopian pop star's murder reveals political riftsFiraol Ajema and his friends, dressed in black T-shirts, have been meeting each afternoon in recent days to listen to the music of Ethiopian pop star Hachalu Hundessa. The homemade shirts bearing the dead singer's portrait and the slogan "I am also Hachalu" are their way of honouring the man whose murder Monday sparked violence that killed nearly 100 and highlighted Ethiopia's simmering ethnic tensions. "We haven't been able to properly mourn," said Firaol, a university student in the town of Legetafo outside Addis Ababa, where security has been tight since the killing.


Suicide attempts, fights aboard rescue boat carrying 180 migrants

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 18:01

Suicide attempts, fights aboard rescue boat carrying 180 migrantsAfter suicide attempts, fights erupting on board, and migrants jumping into the sea, charity SOS Mediterranee launched an emergency alert on Friday, demanding to be allowed to immediately disembark at a safe port. The humanitarian group, whose vessel the Ocean Viking has been at sea for over a week with 180 migrants aboard, said it could no longer guarantee the safety of the migrants or crew and called a state of emergency in an unprecedented step. The boat, which has been in limbo in the Mediterranean south of Sicily, has been waiting for over a week for permission from Italy or Malta to offload the migrants at a safe port.


'A dereliction of duty': Former CIA director says Trump has gone 'Awol' in handling of coronavirus

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 17:46

 Former CIA director says Trump has gone 'Awol' in handling of coronavirusDonald Trump has gone “Awol” in his leadership of the US through the coronavirus pandemic, former CIA Director and Defence Secretary Leon Panetta has said in a scathing attack on the president.“This president has essentially gone Awol from the job of leadership that he should be providing a country in trouble,” Mr Panneta told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Wednesday, branding the situation a "major crisis".


The American Revolution Was an Important Step Towards Abolishing Slavery—Let's Treat It That Way

Yahoo News - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 17:30

The American Revolution Was an Important Step Towards Abolishing Slavery—Let's Treat It That WayLet us embrace our own beautiful founding idea. Let us show the world, by example, what institutionalized freedom, institutionalized opportunity, and institutionalized justice look like.


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