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Trump news – live: Angry president cuts short Nato summit trip and rages at Trudeau, as Congress launches next stage of impeachment after damning report

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 04:27

 Angry president cuts short Nato summit trip and rages at Trudeau, as Congress launches next stage of impeachment after damning reportDonald Trump has suffered fresh humiliation after world leaders Boris Johnson, Justin Trudeau and Emmanuel Macron were filmed apparently laughing behind his back at a Nato reception at Buckingham Palace in London. The US president slammed the Canadian prime minister as "two-faced" to reporters shortly after, while announcing the abrupt cancellation of a press conference later that day, saying he would insteads be returning home.Back in Washington, the House Judiciary Committee was preparing to hold its first public impeachment hearing into the president after House Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff published a damning 300-page report detailing “overwhelming evidence of misconduct” by Mr Trump and his inner circle over Ukraine, with call records dragging Rudy Giuliani and Devin Nunes further into the scandal.


French lawmakers tackle anti-Semitism as Jewish graves desecrated

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 04:23

French lawmakers tackle anti-Semitism as Jewish graves desecratedScores of Jewish graves were found desecrated in a cemetery in eastern France, police said, hours before lawmakers adopted a resolution equating anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism. Some 107 graves were defaced with anti-Semitic inscriptions in the city of Westhoffen, while graffiti against Jews was also found in nearby Schafhouse-sur-Zorn on Tuesday. France has Europe's biggest Jewish community - around 550,000 - and anti-Semitic attacks are common, with more than 500 alone in 2018.


Trump ‘was p****d’ about Giuliani’s claim he had insurance in case president turned on him

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 04:22

Trump ‘was p****d’ about Giuliani’s claim he had insurance in case president turned on himRudy Giuliani’s claim he had an “insurance policy” in the event Donald Trump turned on him angered the president so much he barred him from appearing on Fox News, it has been claimed.In an interview with Fox and Friends host Ed Henry last month, Mr Giuliani attempted to shrug off assertions he could used as a scapegoat by the US president as impeachment evidence mounts against him.


Judge dismisses lawsuit in John Dillinger exhumation case

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 04:06

Judge dismisses lawsuit in John Dillinger exhumation caseA judge dismissed a lawsuit Wednesday by a nephew of 1930s gangster John Dillinger who wants to exhume the notorious criminal's Indianapolis gravesite to prove whether he's actually buried there, ruling that he must get the cemetery's permission. Marion County Superior Court Judge Timothy Oakes granted Crown Hill Cemetery's motion to dismiss Michael Thompson's lawsuit shortly after a hearing Wednesday, saying in his order that Indiana law requires the cemetery's consent.


Why is Elizabeth Warren falling in the polls? Blame Medicare-for-all.

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 03:55

Why is Elizabeth Warren falling in the polls? Blame Medicare-for-all.Before Elizabeth Warren had "a plan for that," the GOP had its own man with a plan. A decade ago, Paul Ryan championed a "roadmap" to curb the national debt and rein in entitlement spending through free-market reforms of the big programs that benefit the elderly. Republicans seemed to buy in: Despite Democrats labeling his "Path to Prosperity" plan a cruel austerity program that would hurt seniors, Ryan rode this ambitious budget blueprint to two committee chairmanships, a vice presidential nomination and the House speakership.But the triumph of the Ryan plan did not last long. The former speaker is out of Congress and Republicans no longer control the House. The Republican president of the United States, Donald Trump, pointedly rejected Ryan's proposals to retool Social Security and Medicare. Entitlement reform is once again the third rail of American politics; Democrats want to expand rather than cut these programs to cover still more people.History may be about to repeat itself in the form of Warren, the senator from Massachusetts vying for the 2020 Democratic nomination with her promise of "Medicare-for-all" and a move away from most private health insurance. Warren rocketed to near-frontrunner status only to fall in recent polls. There are many factors driving her decline, but it undeniably coincides with the increasing unpopularity of replacing existing health-care arrangements with an expanded Medicare (as opposed to letting people choose to buy into a public option).As Warren soared, Democrats who haggled with her over the price tag of "Medicare-for-all" and the feasibility of her progressive policy agenda -- with the significant exception of former Vice President Joe Biden -- appeared doomed to also-ran status. Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney lost his eligibility for the debate stage as Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar struggled to hang on. But by the end of November, Warren toppled by 14 points to a virtual tie for third place in Quinnipiac's national poll with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders as Biden reclaimed the lead, with South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg -- newly re-tacking to the center -- rounding into second. Warren has also tumbled to third place in the RealClearPolitics polling averages for Iowa and New Hampshire while trailing Biden in both Nevada and South Carolina.At the same time, according to Quinnipiac, only 36 percent of voters deem Warren's version of Medicare-for-all a "good idea," and 52 percent think it is a "bad idea." As recently as August 2017, the split was 51-38 in Warren's favor.Indeed, the same problem that plagued Ryan's big ideas seem to be plaguing Warren's: People don't like it when their existing entitlements are disrupted. This is especially true of health care, whether it is interrupted by more government (think ObamaCare) or by attempts to reduce government (think Trump-era efforts to repeal ObamaCare). As Ryan's downfall shows, no matter how gradual the proposed phase-in of new such policies, voters simply are not convinced they won't get stung, and Warren is grappling with this reality now.Now, just as establishment Republicans began to entertain second thoughts about following Ryan's roadmap, the public's turn on Medicare-for-all has spooked other Democratic contenders. The candidates who have jumped in late, such as former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, are skeptics of this leftward economic shift. The party knows it can run to the left of Bill Clinton and win nationally -- Barack Obama did it twice. Democrats are now grappling with whether they can run to the left of Obama and do the same. Polling might suggest they cannot: Quinnipiac found that only 14 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters think Obama was not liberal enough, while 80 percent found the 44th president "just right."One of Warren's problems is that she has been unwilling to acknowledge the middle-class tax increases her plans will certainly entail, refusing to give her opponents the televised "gotcha moment" as she remains steadfast the insurance cost savings will offset this burden. Yes, Warren is right that Americans are unsatisfied with the costs of the current health-care system. And Ryan was correct that the math of our existing entitlement programs doesn't add up. But whether your solution is a greater federal role or better functioning markets, the transition is politically challenging, no matter how good your plan.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com Trump's pathological obsession with being laughed at The most important day of the impeachment inquiry Jerry Falwell Jr.'s false gospel of memes


Elon Musk tells court tweet calling British cave diver ‘pedo guy’ was not meant literally

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 03:36

Elon Musk tells court tweet calling British cave diver ‘pedo guy’ was not meant literallyElon Musk has appeared in court to testify in a defamation lawsuit brought by a British cave diver who he called a “pedo guy” on Twitter.Giving evidence in Los Angeles, the Tesla founder insisted his slur was not meant to be taken literally and was only a “taunt” aimed at Vernon Unsworth during a war of words over his offer to help rescue a schoolboy football team from a flooded cave in Thailand.


The year the world woke up to the climate emergency

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 03:31

The year the world woke up to the climate emergencySpurred on by Swedish wunderkind Greta Thunberg -- virtually unknown outside of her homeland a year ago but now a global star nominated for a Nobel prize -- millions of young people took part in weekly demonstrations demanding climate action. Although scientists have warned for decades about the risk to humanity and Earth posed by unfettered burning of fossil fuels, in 2019 -- set to be the second hottest year in history -- their message seems to have finally hit home. The 2015 Paris agreement saw nations commit to limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels as a way of curbing the worst impacts of global warming.


Mixed-race couple in South Africa navigates traditional customs

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 02:25

Mixed-race couple in South Africa navigates traditional customsOnce outlawed and punishable by prison, celebrating love across racial and cultural barriers would have been unimaginable in apartheid South Africa


‘I’ll see you at your trial’: Kamala Harris hits back at Trump taunt after dropping out of 2020 race

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 02:24

 Kamala Harris hits back at Trump taunt after dropping out of 2020 raceKamala Harris has hit back at Donald Trump after the president taunted her for dropping out of the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries.Ms Harris, who was seen as a potential frontrunner earlier this year, blamed funding issues for her decision and said she could not continue running “in good faith” as there was no longer a realistic path forward for her campaign.


Texas Deer Hunters Tell Tale of Kidnapping After Deadly Mexican Cartel Shootout

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 02:23

Texas Deer Hunters Tell Tale of Kidnapping After Deadly Mexican Cartel ShootoutA Thanksgiving weekend deer-hunting trip to Mexico took a terrifying turn for two Texans who say they suddenly found themselves the ones with rifles pointed at them.Donald Chapman and his nephew, Colby Williams, said the gunmen who appeared before them on Sunday apparently had been part of a convoy of cartel sicarios that rolled into the nearby town of Villa Union the day before.The sicarios had mounted a surprise attack on the town hall and killed four police officers. But the hitmen got a surprise of their own and found themselves the target of a fierce government response that included Mexican marines and military helicopters. Photos posted online showed several bullet-riddled and abandoned pick-up trucks bearing the letters C.D.N., for Cartel del Noreste, the Cartel of the Northeast. The occupants not among the 10 sicarios killed in the first hour seem to have fled into the surrounding countryside.The government pursued the remaining sicarios on into Sunday, killing at least seven more. It appears that’s when a number of the hunted gunmen then encountered the hunting Texans.A New Twist in the Horrific Massacre of American Moms and Kids in MexicoChapman, 62, and Williams, 30, were out on a 10,000-acre ranch they had leased with a single purpose.“It’s just really good deer hunting,” Williams told The Daily Beast.As they faced the sicarios, Williams and Chapman also faced the possibility of being as dead as a bagged buck. But they said that as soon as they obeyed a command to get down on the ground, the Mexicans threw their guns over their shoulders. The Texans said their captors took their rifles and their cellphones. But that was just a precaution. What they really wanted was Chapman’s pick-up along with Williams’ pick-up, which they had left back at the ranch house.“They were walking,” Chapman later said. “They were lost.” They were also hungry and thirsty. The two Texans said they gave them food and water.“You do those kind of things if you have a weapon at you,” Williams noted.Another thing you do is get in a car when instructed. By Chapman and Williams’ account, they all rode off in the two vehicles. “They used us to get where they wanted to be, which was home and their families,” Williams said.The Texans said their captors treated them surprisingly well.“They were nice to me, and to be honest with you, did not hurt us in any way,” Williams reported.Chapman recalled, “Every other word out of their mouth was, ‘No problem, you’ll be OK. We don’t hurt Americans.’”After 11 hours, the captors had arrived where they wanted to go. They gave the Texans back their cellphones and the rest of their property. “Everything that had been taken,” Williams said.But that was not the biggest surprise.“It seems wild, but they washed our vehicles and put fuel in them,” Williams said.Chapman recalled that they only washed his nephew’s truck.“And detailed it,” Chapman told The Daily Beast. “Mine’s still dirty.”The Mexican Cartels vs. a Mormon Sect: Behind the Horrific Massacre of American Moms and ChildrenThe gunmen had made it back to their families and now they were freeing the Texans to go back to theirs.Their gas tanks full, the Texans headed straight for the border.“We got across as soon as possible,” Wiliams said.Chapman said he checked his phone and saw missed calls and messages from seemingly every law enforcement outfit.“The FBI, Secret Service, Homeland Security, all the agencies,” Chapman told The Daily Beast. “Apparently, I was important to be found.”Reports of their disappearance had already surfaced in the Mexican media and on social media, and their families had seen a report online that they had both been murdered. When Williams and Chapman called home to say they were on their way back, Caller ID was the first signal to their loved ones the two were alive.“They were excited to see our call,” Williams said with a Texas boy’s understatement.Nobody from anywhere was ever happier to be returning home. He pulled up to his house in his gleaming, detailed pick-up. “I’ve got three kids under age 4,” Williams said. “I wanted to enjoy every minute I had with him.”He understood how easily that news report could have proven true.  “We were just lucky the good Lord above took care of us,” he said. “I’ve been on my knees ever since.”Williams was asked on Tuesday if he expected to go deer hunting in Mexico again.“No, sir,” he answered.Chapman was headed to Kansas in his still-dirty pick-up.“I’m deer hunting north this time,” he said.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Trump’s $28 Billion Trade War Bailout Is Overpaying Many Farmers

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 02:00

Trump’s $28 Billion Trade War Bailout Is Overpaying Many Farmers(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. President Donald Trump’s $28 billion farm bailout may be paying many growers more than the trade war with China has cost them.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s calculations overshot the impact of the trade conflict on American soybean prices, according to six academic studies, a conclusion that is likely to add to criticism that the bailout has generated distortions and inequalities in the farm economy.“It’s clear that the payment rates overstated the damage suffered by soybean growers,” said Joseph Glauber, the USDA’s former chief economist who published a review of the research in late November. “Based on what the studies show, the damages were about half that.”The academic research has focused on soybeans in part because the crop has been the most visible target of Chinese retaliation and overall received the most trade aid. But the method the department used to calculate trade losses also likely overstates the conflict’s financial impact on most other farm products, though for a few commodities it may understate the true impact, Glauber, now a senior fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute, said in an interview.The divergence doesn’t necessarily mean a bonanza for American farmers, who are being financially squeezed on other fronts, including a global commodity glut that is depressing prices and a year of wild weather that is damaging crop yields. Also, the trade conflict risks long-term loss of market share for U.S. producers as overseas customers build relationships with replacement suppliers. Neither the academic nor the USDA estimates take potential future market losses into account.“You’re ruining a huge export market,” said Yuqing Zheng, an agricultural economist at the University of Kentucky. “Longer term, we don’t know for sure what the impact will be. Even if there is no future tariff, China might import less from the United States.”Still, a team led by Zheng estimated the trade conflict depressed U.S. soybean prices by only 36 cents per bushel in its first year, a period in which the bailout program paid soybean growers more than four times that: $1.65 per bushel.The scale of the farm rescue package has now swelled to more than twice the ultimate $12 billion cost of the controversial auto industry bailouts under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. And it’s increasingly come under under fire.Senate Democrats issued a report in November arguing the trade aid program favors large producers over smaller ones. An advocacy group, the Environmental Working Group, released a study that asserted big farms so far have been the main beneficiaries of the billions of dollars in aid payments.The USDA forecast last week net farm income will rise more than 10% this year to $92.5 billion, with additional government aid accounting for all of the increase in profits. Almost 40% of projected U.S. farm profits this year will come from trade aid, disaster assistance, federal subsidies and insurance payments. With the extra aid, farmers will have their highest profits in six years, though still well below the $124 billion they netted in 2013, according to the department.Midwest SupportersThe trade aid, particularly for soybeans, largely goes to the president’s political supporters. Polls show Trump has maintained overwhelming backing from farmers. In the 2016 election, Trump won eight of the 10 states with the largest soybean acreage, all of them in the Midwest. Glauber estimates more than half of the direct payments under the USDA’s market facilitation program cover soybeans.The apparent over-payment stems from the method the USDA used to compute trade damages for the rescue package. The department forecast the overall price impact of punitive tariffs China and other nations imposed on U.S. farm products without considering sales farmers would gain as the world market reorganized in response. But as China bought more soybeans from Brazil, instead of the U.S., other buyers stepped in to purchase more soybeans from the U.S., replacing product they had previously bought from Brazil.“A broader analysis like some of these show the beans go elsewhere,” Glauber said. “They don’t just go into storage. Some of them go to Europe. Some of them go to other uses. We ended up crushing a lot more soybeans in 2018 than expected. We exported more vegetable oil, more protein meal. All of that mitigates the price impact.”Pat Westhoff, director of the University of Missouri’s Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, led a team that estimated tariffs from China and other nations involved in trade disputes caused the price of U.S. soybeans to drop by 78 cents per bushel.The USDA projections “do not consider the impact of exports to other markets,” Westhoff said. “They consider only the negatives and not the positives.”New MarketsMichael Adjemian, an economist at the University of Georgia, came up with a lower impact: 52 cents a bushel. He based his model on the export price for soybeans in New Orleans.“New markets emerged,” Adjemian said. “We sold more to the rest of the world, though not enough to make up all of the difference.”Robert Johannson, the USDA’s chief economist, said the department decided to base trade aid on a projection of “gross” trade losses rather “net” losses primarily for consistent treatment of producers of diverse farm products affected. It’s harder to isolate net trade impact for specialty crops such as pecans or almonds than for major commodities such as soybeans, he said.“We need to be pretty sure whatever method we use is consistent across all commodities,” Johannson said. “You can imagine what the reaction would be if we said we’ll use this model for soybeans and that model for sorghum and another one for cotton.”USDA officials also concluded after consulting with U.S. trade negotiators that there was an advantage to using the gross damages method because it is the basis the country uses for arguing cases before the World Trade Organization, which handles international trade disputes, Johannson said.Transportation FactorIndividual producers also may face greater losses than the overall net price impact of the trade war depending on their location because there may be higher transportation costs for moving their goods to a different market or other adjustment costs, he added.In some cases, though, the method the USDA uses to compute trade aid may understate losses to farmers. Westhoff cited corn growers. The gross trade losses cover only the direct impact of the tariff dispute. Corn growers have primarily been hurt by indirect effects as farmers who might otherwise grow soybeans produce corn instead, bringing down corn prices, he said.The USDA has made a higher trade damage estimate for soybeans in this year’s aid program, at $2.05 per bushel, which Westhoff said also exceeds his group’s estimate for the impact in the period.This year’s payment is higher because the USDA decided to calculate the damage based on export sales over the past 10 years; last year’s payment was based on a comparison with the prior year.Wendy Brannen, a spokeswoman for the American Soybean Association, declined to comment.To contact the reporter on this story: Mike Dorning in Washington at mdorning@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Millie MunshiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


How Surviving a Hurricane Turned Into Surviving Discrimination

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 00:49

How Surviving a Hurricane Turned Into Surviving DiscriminationHaitian migrants face deportation and stigma in hurricane-ravaged Bahamas.


8 of the biggest takeaways from a new book on Melania Trump that reveal her fashion, strategy, and life inside the White House

Yahoo News - Wed, 12/04/2019 - 00:38

8 of the biggest takeaways from a new book on Melania Trump that reveal her fashion, strategy, and life inside the White House"Free, Melania: The Unauthorized Biography," captures Trump as an untraditional first lady at the center of many misconceptions.


Unvaccinated to show red flags as Samoa battles measles epidemic

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 23:33

Unvaccinated to show red flags as Samoa battles measles epidemicAuthorities in Samoa asked unvaccinated families to display a red flag outside their homes on Wednesday to help a mass immunisation drive aimed at halting a measles epidemic that has killed dozens of children. The tiny Pacific nation of 200,000 will grind to a halt on Thursday and Friday as non-essential government services close so public servants can help the vaccination campaign. Over the two-day period, teams will go door-to-door administering vaccines in a desperate bid to raise the low immunity levels in Samoa that have fuelled the epidemic.


F-15X: A Few Billions Dollars Down the Drain (Why Not More F-35s Instead?)

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 23:30

 A Few Billions Dollars Down the Drain (Why Not More F-35s Instead?)Stealth really matters against modern air defenses.


Unvaccinated to show red flags as Samoa battles measles epidemic

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 23:28

Unvaccinated to show red flags as Samoa battles measles epidemicAuthorities in Samoa asked unvaccinated families to display a red flag outside their homes on Wednesday to help a mass immunisation drive aimed at halting a measles epidemic that has killed dozens of children. The tiny Pacific nation of 200,000 will grind to a halt on Thursday and Friday as non-essential government services close so public servants can help the vaccination campaign. Over the two-day period, teams will go door-to-door administering vaccines in a desperate bid to raise the low immunity levels in Samoa that have fuelled the epidemic.


The Reviews Are In: 31 Air Force Pilots Say Why They Love the F-35 Stealth Fighter

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 23:00

 31 Air Force Pilots Say Why They Love the F-35 Stealth FighterThis is better than checking Yelp.


United Airlines orders 50 Airbus aircraft to replace Boeing 757s

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 22:48

United Airlines orders 50 Airbus aircraft to replace Boeing 757sUnited Airlines said Tuesday it had ordered 50 Airbus A321XLR aircraft, worth an estimated $6.5 billion, to replace an existing fleet of aging Boeings. The new Airbus planes, to be delivered starting 2024, will allow United to retire its Boeing 757-200s, the company said. The Airbus order is the latest blow to the American manufacturer, already deeply mired in the crisis surrounding its 737 MAX, which has been grounded worldwide after two crashes that resulted in 346 deaths.


Mahathir, world's oldest prime minister, prepares to host his second APEC summit

Yahoo News - Tue, 12/03/2019 - 22:46

Mahathir, world's oldest prime minister, prepares to host his second APEC summitMalaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad formally launched on Wednesday preparations to host next year's APEC summit, recalling with pride how his country hosted the event more than 20 years ago, but also flagging risks. The 94-year-old, who unexpectedly won a general election last year, has said he will stay on as prime minister to see through the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit before possibly handing the baton to a coalition colleague. "We believe it is quite fitting for Malaysia to kick-start our second opportunity to host APEC at the same place as we did just over two decades ago," Mahathir said at the launch ceremony in Cyberjaya, which houses many information technology companies on the edge of the capital, Kuala Lumpur.


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